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Former paratrooper confronts uniformed men ‘posing as charity worker’ but making a profit

A furious ex-soldier confronted three men who were apparently posing as charity workers helping homeless veterans at Christmas while actually making a profit.

An anonymous ex-serviceman spotted the camouflaged men collecting coins with a bucket in Nottingham city centre.

But he says they were not serving soldiers, making it an offence to wear the colours.

A furious ex-soldier confronted three men who were apparently posing as charity workers helping homeless veterans at Christmas

He then bamboozled them with questions about their military history, IDs and charity permits.

Mr Eastway recorded the angry exchange on his phone as the men become aggressive when he told them: ‘You are not ex-forces,’ in front of stunned passersby.

The men were asking for £3 to £5 for blue wristbands for ‘Invcited’, which Mr Easyway says is a play on words of Prince Harry’s Invictus charity.

They admitted that they keep £1 from every sale for themselves. 

But when asked for a charity number, ID badges and permits from the local council, they were stumped and became aggressive.

The Charities Commission has no record of Invicted Foundation and a Facebook page for the group has just 170 members.

Footage shows Mr Eastway ask them: ‘Where’s your ID?’ and one of the men replies: ‘I haven’t got one,’ before becoming aggressive.

Another says: ‘We are ex-forces,’ and Mr Eastway says: ‘You’re not ex-forces though, are you. Lets talk about your bands.’

One of the men says: ‘It’s called Invicted. We came out of the army and set up.’

The men were bamboozled with questions about their military history, IDs and charity permits

Asked if he’s posing as a charity, the man says: ‘We are a limited company. So the money comes to us and this is what we do with it.’

The men then mumble before walking away from Mr Eastway at the end of the 5-minute clip.

The counter terrorism expert from Bootle, Merseyside, said: ‘These are out and out rogue traders. They have no connection to any charities.

‘They’re riding off the back of people like me who have fought in Afghanistan, people who have been injured, people who have lost their limbs.

‘None of these men are serving soldiers, so it is an offence for them to wear army uniform in public, let alone be posing as a charity.

‘They were selling wristbands and magazines to people who believed that they were helping soldiers.

‘But these guys were clearly not serving soldiers and had none of the proper documents when I confronted them.

The men showed one of their leaflets about their ‘limited company’ called Invicted

‘It’s morally wrong, ethically wrong, and legally wrong and it needs to be stopped.’

Shane Hartley, seen in the video wearing black gloves and with light brown hair combed to one side, said he had been a serving soldier but left six weeks ago.

Speaking after the confrontation, he said: ‘I’m not in the army anymore.

‘We’re not a charity. We’re just trying to help people at Christmas but people want to know about how much money we’re earning like we’re some kind of millionaires.

‘We’re putting homeless people in a hotel over Christmas.’

In November Manchester Police issued a warning about the group, which claimed to be collecting cash for armed forces and homeless charities by selling wristbands and magazines.

City centre inspector Phil Surgeon said they were investigating the group and told them to ‘steer clear’.

Greater Manchester Police confiscated a bag of the group’s branded ‘Invicted Foundation’ wrist-bands and said that they would prosecute them for breaking street trading laws and the Uniform Act.

 


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